Category Archives: WordPress

WordPress to Plone

The time has come for me to move away from WordPress. I’ve been saying that for a while. I realized that I could migrate to Wagtail which is a CMS that sits on top of Django, but it requires some assembly. However, I can migrate to Plone much faster, and that is what I intend to do.

I  will continue to support my existing WordPress clients and won’t push them to migrate to Plone. One or two might benefit, but WordPress is a good platform and is well supported. Why should they have to pay for a site twice? I worked with Plone extensively in the past, but not recently. I am looking at it again and it has improved dramatically and is no longer just for enterprise level websites. It can fill some of the niche that WordPress does.

I’m going to give myself 30 days from today to migrate my site to Plone. I still want to work with Wagtail, but mostly I want to work more with Python. It’s my favorite computer language. PHP not so much which is what WordPress is written in. The WordPress community is large, active, and makes up for the shortcomings of the language.  The developers of the language have continued to make it more robust and secure, but that is not where my interests lie.

You have to go with what works for you. Python is easier to maintain and easier for me to figure out what the code of some project is doing if I look at it.

Poetical Mail

I’m testing MailPoet for a client. Normally I use a development site, but I needed a site with content to try it out. My client had been using Subscribe2 and it works pretty good, but MailPoet seems to have a few more features that they desire.

 

MailPoet and Subscribe2 allow you to send emails of new posts either singly or in digest form to subscribers to your website.

The pictures I put in the post are arbitrary. This and the Featured image are from the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Whomper II

Why would you want to do that?

Because I can. Turns out you can change the default editor font of TinyMCE and if you so desire make it match the font seen by visitors to your website.  You create a special css file place it in your theme and then add a function to functions.php file to load it.

It’s not something that’s ever been on my radar. Much of the time I’m editing in the Text tab (so I can see the raw HTML) and whether I used the Visual tab I always used the Preview button to see what my changes were going to look like, but I can understand why someone might want to change the default font of their editor.

I always learn new stuff from client requests.

WordPress 4.5

I had a client contact me this morning that their site had crashed. They received an email message from their host provider saying their version of WordPress had been upgraded. I saw the error message and most likely the upgrade failed, hosing the site. This can only be fixed via FTP. Even the login screen gives the same error message.

I won’t know until I have access to the client’s server to determine what the actual problem is. It could also be a plugin or theme conflict.

Anyway, before warning or advising my other clients about upgrading to the just released WordPress 4.5 I thought I’d go ahead and upgrade this website. I backed up all my files and database and then I updated all my plugins and themes. I then ran the WordPress update and it updated successfully.

It does happen that updates fail and it could be WordPress, a theme or a plugin. You can manually deactivate themes and plugins via ftp access by renaming their respective folder. This breaks the connection and sometimes the error goes away. If it’s not a plugin or theme then WordPress is hosed and you’ll need to manually reinstall the files via FTP.

Update: I checked their site and it was missing files from the WordPress install. I replaced them and their site was happy again.

Multi-Site Conversion

The steps to convert a WordPress 3 site to a muti-site isn’t too difficult but there doesn’t seem to be a way to convert one back. You can if you use WP Database Backup. You export only the single site tables and then you import the backup into new WP single site setup. I’ll outline the details in a future post.